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CAMERON HIGHLANDS > KEA'S FARM
 

Cameron Highlands Resorts
Merlin Inn
Ye Olde Smokehouse
Heritage Hotel
Cameron Highlands Attractions
Old Route: Tapah-Ringlet
New Route: Ipoh-Kg. Raja
Sg Palas Tea Plantation
Boh Tea Centre
Brinchang Tea Valley
Mt Brinchang
Strawberry Farm
Kea's Farm
Cameron Golf Course
Bharat Tea Plantation
Brinchang Town
Tanah Rata Town
Ringlet Town
Sultan Abu Bakar Lake

 
 
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LOCATION:
Cameron Highlands (or Tanah Tinggi Cameron in Malay) is located in the state of Pahang. Currently, there are two main roads that connect major towns in west coast of Peninsula Malaysia (such as Kuala Lumpur, Ipoh and Penang) to this popular highland resort town. The older access point is the Tapah - Ringlet route while the newer access has since been built from Simpang Pulai - Kg Raja.

Kea's Farm is located just a few kilometres north of Brinchang town. If you are coming from the new Simpang Pulai - Kg Raja highway, you have to pass along Blue Valley and Tringkap before you will start to see the towering complex of Equatorial Resort. Kea's Farm is located right after the resort's main entrance.

DESCRIPTION:
In general, there are way too many vegetable, fruit, flower and strawberry farms in Cameron Highlands, which should come as no surprise as the accommodative temperate weather pays heed to the incessant calls of tourist dollars. OK, that might be quite a strong statement. After all, the Peninsula of Malaysia and the island-state of Singapore heavily rely on fresh greens of this highland resort to satiate the needs for adequate vegetable supplies.

As I mentioned previously, there are probably close to a hundred of farms in Cameron Highlands, some are purely commercial (hence do not welcome prying eyes of the tourists), while some others gladly open their arms (and cash registers) to wandering tourists looking for a piece of the so-called fresh-off-the-garden greens. Not just vegetables though, there are farms for honey bees, butterflies, roses, wild orchids, strawberries (this one is a given as trips to Cameron Highlands often conjures up with images of these succulent red harvest) and oddly, cacti! While you can spend one or two days touring each and everyone of them, a short trip to Kea's Farm should sufficiently give a good glimpse of what Cameron Highlands has to offer when it comes to farming.

By the way, who on earth is Kea? To be honest, I have no idea. Most likely it is the name of the land owner for this large tract of farm land. You will not be able to see the many farms at the main entrance just as yet. Knowing that very few people would care to venture further than a few metres, commercial stalls are the first thing that will greet you as you enter the area. There are some head-turning produces on sale at the stalls. I was piqued with interest when seeing rare vegetables like freshly-picked carrots and broccoli. I just did not know they were grown here as well. Other fresh produces were neatly arranged in colourful formation, knowing that the tourists will not hesitate to spare a buck or two for those tender tomatoes and water-sprinkled cabbages.

As always, the strawberry vendors are usually the loudest. Mumbling that it was going to rain so the price of that a-few-hundred-gram fruit was marked down. Of course, later on my way back, the price indeed remained the same, rain or shine. While there is no doubt that the strawberries are fresh, juicy and sweet, the practice of the vendors is not something that I find appealing. Almost all the vendors will stuff a thick layer of strawberry leaves under the plastic container before filling the fruits on top, as though to give the impression that buyers are getting a good bargain of strawberries for RM10. It is hard to see this kind of irresponsible act upfront, but as soon as you chow down half of the content, you will notice the useless stuffed leaves underneath. Unless, I am not aware of any new cooking recipes that actually use strawberry leaves, as, hmm, vegetable?

Enough about the vegetable vendors. It is highly recommended that you make the walk further down into the farming area. After all, nicely packaged cauliflowers can also be found in the aisles of TESCO or Giant supermarkets as much as you could see them at the stalls. To me, the tour inside the actual farm was quite an eye-opening. Here, one gets to see various stages of vegetable farming. Just as you thought you are seeing lettuce plants, they turn out to be cabbage trees instead. I also got to see how tomato trees look like - something that one most likely cannot find in the lowlands.

MY VERDICT:
Superb green selections with eye-catching displays of flowers and rare vegetables. The walk down to the farming area is recommended for a different experience altogether.

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